Confidential Art School – The Boston Globe


Although they weren’t completely back to normal, MassArt students have revived drawing live models in classrooms, blowing (and sometimes shattering) glass, and making short stop motion films. The Globe caught up with three of these students to find out what their home arts education looked like and what it looks like now that they’re back in studios on campus.

The best part about being on campus more regularly, said Jade Kerry, an animation major from the Massachusetts College of Art and Design, is the “light environment” fostered by the presence of her peers. Barry Chin / Globe Staff

Name: Jade Kerry

Major: Animation

Year: Senior

What she is currently working on: His senior project, a stop-motion film about a girl clown who lives with the ghost of his deceased girlfriend.

How she worked from home: At MassArt, stop-motion students have access to industrial-grade equipment: an automated camera and stationary lights move according to computerized specifications to capture the 24 frames needed in every second of film. When she was home, Kerry had to recreate this demanding setup with a manual tripod, makeshift animation table, and lights attached to whatever stations she could find. The most crucial part? Remember to close the door to prevent your cats from entering. “They wouldn’t be allowed to enter the room because they would jump on everything and knock things over,” she said.

The most difficult part of remote art creation: Loss of rapport with his peers. “We have a room called the über kitchen, where a lot of the animation majors will go to work and relax,” she said. “Not having this was definitely a loss.”

The best part about being back in the studios: Being with her peers again and cultivating “a lighter environment – fooling around with people and keeping morale up while we do our jobs so we don’t burn out,” she said.

Celia Delani, glass and industrial design double major, looks at a finished glass mug in the glassblowing workshop.
Celia Delani, glass and industrial design double major, looks at a finished glass mug in the glassblowing workshop.Barry Chin / Globe Staff

Name: Celia Delani

Major: Glass and industrial design

Year: Senior

What she is currently working on: Trying to do “The perfect cup” in glass – with uniform thickness, a flat bottom and straight sides – for her thesis project.

How she worked from home: Because she couldn’t do glassblowing or industrial design remotely, Delani forged projects from the materials she had at home. For a glass jewelry class, she made a flower crown out of wire, glue, and nail polish. “I had to find all the materials I had at home,” she said. “It forces you to use what you have – to be creative in a different way.”

The most difficult part of remote art creation: “Motivation,” she said.

What she learned: Without access to the “hot shop” (the glassblowing studio), Delani honed his drawing and design skills. “I thought about what I was doing a lot more, instead of just going in and experimenting,” she said.

Best part of being back: “See everyone. I like working with other people in the studio, ”she said.

Josselyn Siegel, illustration student at MassArt, draws live model Ken Perez in her advanced drawing class.
Josselyn Siegel, illustration student at MassArt, draws live model Ken Perez in her advanced drawing class.Matthew J Lee / Globe staff

Name: Josselyn siegel

Major: Drawing

Year: Junior

What she is currently working on: For his latest projects, Siegel creates a 72 x 37 inch pastel scene of a cowboy in a desert, a zine titled “Why Monsters Can’t Skateboard” and a watercolor by his DJ friend. .

How she worked from home: She drew on her apartment in Roxbury (then Jamaica Plain). “There was no separation between the workspace and the home space,” she said. “It was cramped and the air was tight all the time.”

The most difficult part of remote art creation: The nuances of his art are lost in the translation. For example, in her technical illustration class, to learn one-point perspective, she had to draw a building in the city from a photo she took. “I was trying to figure out what something looked like in 3D from something flat,” she said.

What she learned: “I don’t really care what other people think of my art anymore,” said Siegel, who enjoys drawing monsters and other bloody creatures. “I struggled with that a lot before COVID hit, and then when COVID hit I was like, you know what, I’m just going to do what I love. “

The best part about being back in the studios: To feel that his work is on an upward trajectory. “Being able to see this progress is so uplifting because, like, I’m going somewhere,” she said.


Dana Gerber can be reached at [email protected]


Kayleen C. Rice