Rethinking the school of contemporary art in India

The slogan and timeline of “contemporary art education” from the Cold War era to today still holds a fair place, although the context has changed. Riding on radical changes, institutions are likely to adopt new methods of teaching, artistic creation and implementation of immersive learning experiences

The saga of art’s relationship to education has been debated since time immemorial. Art has been an integral part of Indian culture and tradition for centuries. The revolution in the history of contemporary art began with Raja Ravi Verma – “The Father of Modern Indian Art” who painted anecdotes from Indian epics and Sanskritic literature and was the first modern artist to India. Amrita Sher-Gil was a Hungarian-Punjabi Indian painter. She was a “pioneer” of modern art and one of the greatest female artists of the early 20th century. Another significant change in contemporary schools in India was the Visva Bharati University, founded by Rabindra Nath Tagore and the British rulers. Visva Bharati was established with the aim of exploring arts, language, humanities and music as a center of culture. In 1951, it was finally declared an institution of national importance by Parliament. The school was introduced in India to realize the importance of ancient education. And then “The Faculty of Fine Arts of the University of Baroda” showed the way to follow in the teaching of contemporary art in India. It was established in 1949 and has become one of the leading art colleges in India.

The slogan and timeline of “contemporary art education” from the Cold War era to today still holds a fair place, although the context has changed. Riding on radical changes, institutions are likely to adopt new methods of teaching, artistic creation and implementation of immersive learning experiences. The vision of New Indian Contemporary Art Schools is to better understand their communities and build their foundations with a more culture-centered approach. With the advent of new technologies in the 21st century, institutions have started offering concentrated exposure to Indian art and cultural resources along with intensive training programs to redefine the pedagogy of Indian teaching and learning practices. Indian contemporary art schools. The aim of contemporary art schools in India is not only to explore a student’s potential and talent, but also to make them more aware of their environment and society. Additionally, the Covid pandemic has brought about a long-awaited paradigm shift in global work culture, which can be seen as a starting point for art to gain relevance over STEM subjects. A number of universities and fine arts schools in India have started offering online courses, and recruiters have resorted to hiring talent from around the world, which has not only opened up avenues for aspirants to art, but added to the popularity of the field as a whole. .

Go forward

A career in fine arts means entering an emerging field in India today. Arts education is a distinct academic stream, with new specialist training choices run by government and private institutions. There is a range of course choices, both long-term and short-term. Art is finally starting to be seen as an important contributor to our lives and our community, and the Indian government has started focusing on new ideas to overhaul art education in schools and colleges. Using a multidisciplinary approach, art schools are committed to supporting new learning and teaching methodologies, with an emphasis on supporting arts education that portrays Indian culture and traditions.

Recently, many university-level initiatives have expanded educational opportunities for arts candidates. Alongside institutional training, there are several independent initiatives that aim to update knowledge and skills in contemporary Indian art and the cultural sector. With the proliferation of government initiatives, private institutes also recognize the importance of training and teaching contemporary art to follow the latest practices in the field. There is a move towards greater cultural collaborations between India and other countries with the aim of strengthening resources and enterprises in the cultural sector. But despite all the positive changes, art has always taken a back seat to other mainstream subjects. The need for the future is to start educating students in contemporary art in order to make them aware of their cultural heritage from an early age. It is common for university curricula in India to have a strong math and science focus, but learning the arts is said to enhance the overall development of a child’s intellect. So we need more contemporary art schools in the country.

Kayleen C. Rice